Be aware of $5 Free Trials for Dr.O’zs Anti-Aging Products

The abundance of ads on the internet for free trials of anti­aging products, as well as the hundreds of women who have been scammed and left comments on womensblogtalk.com inspired me to write this post.

You’ve probably seen the alluring ads with captivating headlines such as “Dr. Oz Calls this a Miracle Cream,” or “Katie Couric’s Backstage Secret,” or “Shhhh Don’t Tell Covergirl.”

Stories of women who “accidentally” discovered a miracle breakthrough in anti­aging by using one cream at night, and another cream in the morning. Honestly though, who doesn’t want to find a miracle cream to reverse the hands of time overnight?

Unfortunately, there is a very deceptive, dark side to these offers, one that most people miss and don’t discover until they notice the exorbitant and monthly recurring charges appear on their credit card statements, leaving them feeling scammed and frustrated.

In this article I will articulate how this new wave of “short­term” (12 day) free trials suck you in, how they function, and why I don’t like 99{36f0bc115d0d9e0db1bfc234ec4a32fcabcfa298c943617ea6e756523a2fdb48} of them.

The $5 Allure of Looking Younger Overnight

As women, we want to find a cure for our wrinkles to look young and vibrant again, and wouldn’t it be nice to find something that works overnight? Or in two weeks?

Take for example, the picture of this woman on the right “Brenda,” whom by the way, I’ve seen in numerous ads for various wrinkle creams lately, she’s a poster girl for these scams.

This particular ad is promoting a combination free trial of BioGeniste Wrinkle Reducer and Dermal Meds, and Brenda claims that she obtained these results by using these two products in combination.

I’m sorry to say, but there is no wrinkle cream, or combination of, that will give you this type of result, and this happens to be a photo­shopped image purchased on a popular website called “shutterstock.”

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Do Celebrities Really Endorse Wrinkle Creams?

No, they don’t! These scam companies claim celebrities such as Sandra Bullock, Ellen Degeneres, Katie Couric, Christie Brinkley – even Queen Kate – use these creams to obtain their ageless skin – and the

“proof” seems nothing short of amazing in the before and after pics.

But I can assure you, none of these Hollywood stars promote any of these fly­by­night wrinkle creams scams, much less use these garbage creams.

What about $5 Dr. Oz Wrinkle Creams?

If a picture of Dr. Oz (or any other celebrity) is in a wrinkle cream ad, it must be true right? WRONG, think again!

Dr. Oz is plagiarized more than anyone on the web!

These scam artists use his pictures, video clips, fake quotes, anything to make you believe that Dr. Oz is recommending them.

In this picture of Dr. Oz and Oprah, they state that Oprah is retiring to pursue her new skin care line with Dr. Oz. This is a flat out lie, please don’t believe them.

Dr. Oz does not, I repeat DOES NOT have his own skin care line, cream or serum. These crooks can say anything they want, don’t believe their false advertisements!

I’m not trying to be mean about this, it’s not your fault that there are liars and crooks out there, I’m just trying to help open your eyes so you won’t fall for it.

I get countless emails every day from women saying “I ordered Dr. Oz’s serum and now he billed me $90, what a jerk for being involved in these scams.” Truth is he’s NOT responsible, because these are not his creams. These are crooks and liars using his name to sell their products!

The Combo Free Trial Offer

Back to the combination offer. In the example I used above, the combination free trial offer was BioGeniste Wrinkle Reducer and Dermal Meds, but I could literally cut and paste about 100 different wrinkle creams in their place because the ads are IDENTICAL, and they often rotate.

“Avonlea and Pristine,” “Nuvalift and Puravol,” Bellalabs and Dermaperfect,” “Absolute Rejuven and Absolute Derma,” “Splendyr Instant Wrinkle Reducer and Levela Anti­Aging Cream,” “Luminelle and Alleure” – there are so many that I can’t possibly list them all but some of these may ring a bell.

They all follow the same story line, usually referencing a celebrity and also a normal lady with the likeness of “Brenda” who by accident, discovered that by using one cream in the morning and one cream at night, she obtained miraculous results. And before you know it, you’re ordering your free trials of both creams.

I mean, you only have to pay $4.95 in shipping so that’s a great deal, right? Wrong. And it’s not always presented as a combination offer – the same deceptive practices are used to offer free trials for individual anti­aging creams and eye creams alike! “Derma Juvenate” and “RVTL Anti­Aging” are two free trials I get a ton of complaints about.

Be weary of any offer that won’t let you proceed to checkout without agreeing to order a second or third eye cream or serum in order to get the cream you’re trying to order – huge red flag!

How Does a Free Trial Actually Work?

“Free trials” are NOT free. When you sign up for a free trial, you’re not only giving them all of your personal information, i.e. name, address, phone, email, but you are REQUIRED to enter your credit card information to accept the free trial (to pay for the shipping).

On the 14th day, you will be billed for the full price of the wrinkle cream that you received (usually about $90, and you can double that if it’s a combo offer), and subsequently billed 30 days later for another month’s supply.

In the example below for Puravol (copied and pasted from their website, had to scroll down to find it), the trial period is only 12 days, and on the 12th day you’ll be billed $99.15, and billed $99.15 every 30 days thereafter.

 

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